Tag Archives: community relations

“Losing over 200 girls is like losing an entire generation”

Today marks the 180th day since the abduction of the over 200 girls from Chibok Local Government Area of Borno State. It is this abduction that sparked the #BringBackOurGirls movement to bring attention to the issue of the missing girls and press the government on a rescue operation for their return. TAP talked to Allen, a local farmer in Chibok LGA, about what it has been like living in Chibok since the abduction, how locals regard the #BringBackOurGirls movement that followed, and the local population’s relationship with the military since the abduction.

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“By this morning, we had 4,478 internally displaced people”

Mallam Haruna Amman Kure, the Executive Secretary of Adamawa State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA) spoke to TAP about his work managing the displacement camp where over 4,000 Nigerians fleeing militia violence from Michika, Mubi, and Madagali Local Governments in Adamawa State, among other areas. He talked about how the displacement camp came to be, shared with us from his statistics how many people were in the camp as of 27th of September, and how local organizations have been working to support the displaced population. He also talked about the mental health needs of the displaced and what SEMA’s work in meeting these needs, as well as voter disenfranchisement in the run-up to the upcoming Adamawa State Elections.

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“How can you depend on [the military] to protect you?”

Mr. Mohammed is a Maiduguri resident who was in Bama when it fell to insurgents. He talks about the relationship between the military and civilians in Maiduguri and how the military’s attitude towards ordinary citizens in Borno has changed over time, and the fragile normalcy of daily life in the city. He also talks about the role that the youth volunteer group known as civilian JTF has played in securing Maiduguri, and trust in the Nigerian military to handle the ongoing crisis.

The violence has been going on for quite a while now in Borno State. How has the relationship between security forces and the populace changed over time?

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“The first people came when their homes were struck [by militants], now people are coming on their own”

Mr. Abubakar Gombe of Red Cross in Gombe State helps to manage an IDP camp for people fleeing insurgency violence in Borno State. The camp is located in the Gombe-Biu by-pass area of Gombe in Gombe State. In this interview, he talks to TAP about his work with the IDPs. He describes IDPs’ typical behavior when they first come into camp, what kind of assistance the Red Cross and other international agencies are rendering, and the importance of the local community in Gombe State welcome of the IDPs. From this interview, we learn that there is still no institutionalized government program to help the IDPs fleeing insurgency violence and that post-traumatic counseling support is still needed for displaced populations in the region.

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“For the 57 girls that escaped, they have all been rehabilitated and we have provided them psychological support”

This post is part of a series of interviews with subject matter experts on the northeast of Nigeria and the ongoing militant violence. TAP hopes these interviews will contribute to an issue-driven conversation on what relevant actors in the region can do to help stop the violence and improve well-being of Nigerians living in violence-prone areas.

Among the challenges in information sharing on the situation ongoing in northeast Nigeria is getting a sense of what the state government is doing to alleviate suffering of the population under its aegis, and what support is needed on the well-being of Nigerians living in the area. The Borno Commissioner of Health Min. Salma Anas-Kolo talked to TAP 10 days ago about her work in service delivery in Borno State, sharing insight into the challenges of internal displacement, the state of public health, and the ways in which state and federal governments are working together in healthcare. She talks about the overcrowding at the displacement camps and the cholera outbreak in the camps as a result. She also addresses the state’s provision of mental health services to 57 girls from Chibok Local Government Area of Borno State who managed to escape their abductors, and the challenges the state is facing in terms of human resources and support.

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“This is, to me, what has laid the foundation for the upsurge of Boko Haram”

This post is part of a series of interviews with subject matter experts on the northeast of Nigeria and the ongoing militant violence. TAP hopes these interviews will contribute to an issue-driven conversation on what relevant actors in the region can do to help stop the violence and improve well-being of Nigerians living in violence-prone areas.

TAP interviewed Dr. Muhammad Kabir Isa is a professor and Head of Department at the Department of Local Government and Development Studies at Ahmadu Bello University (ABU) in Zaria, Nigeria on the origins and evolution of the much-feared Islamist militant organization Jamā’at ahl as-sunnah li-d-da’wa wa-l-jihād, better known as Boko Haram. Dr. Isa is one of the first people to write about the Islamist group, and has been researching and writing on Islamic fundamentalism for years. In this interview, Dr. Isa sheds light on the history of Borno State, the psychology of Boko Haram, the key factors that have fed into the growth and expansion of the Islamist group, and the role that the protracted dearth of development and good governance has played in readying the ground for situation today.

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“We want the world to know that our girls have been abducted and we do not know where they are”

In this video, a father speaks on his daughter’s abduction from the Government Girls Secondary School in Chibok Local Government Area of Borno State during a #BringBackOurGirls sit-in in Abuja 40 days after abduction took place. Abuja is the center of the #BringBackOurGirls activism. The daily sit-ins organized by former Min. Oby Ezekwesili and many notable figures in Nigerian civil society including Women’s Rights and Protection Alternative Haj. Saudatu Mahdi and Center for Democratic Development’s Mr. Jibrin Ibrahim are meant to keep the pressure on the government to act for the safe return of abducted girls. The father speaks in Hausa, and his words are translated by a participant at the sit-in. For more on the #BringBackOurGirls activism geared towards the return of the abducted girls, visit the website

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“He insisted that death is everywhere and if it was his time to die he will die”

As this insurgency rages on, there have been alleged cases of extra-judicial killing by soldiers. In this interview,  a survivor talks to a TAP volunteer about how he lost his beloved father. If you are interested in volunteering for TAP by helping with translations and/or interviews, or even contributing to TAP by sending in interviews of affected Nigerians in the northeastern part of the country, do send us an email at testimonialarchiveproject@gmail.com  Salihu – Can you begin by telling us your name please Mohammed – My name is Mohammed Sani Salihu – From which state? Mohammed – Yobe State Salihu – Can you tell us how you have been  affected by the crises? Mohammed – Yes, I can tell you. On Thursday around 4:30pm, I took some groceries to my parents house. But as I approached the area, I started hearing gun shots. As I tried hard to reach the house, a bullet nearly hit my motorcycle. Upon getting into the house, I gathered the women at home and we hid somewhere to wait for the shooting to end, but it went on for a while, up to around Maghrib prayer time (7pm). So, early in the morning the next day, I told my dad that we should leave this area because many soldiers were being killed, but he refused, insisting that he won’t move, that death is everywhere and if it was  his time to die he will die. It wasn’t long after I left him (from what I was told) that soldiers came and brought them all out, interrogating them and asking them questions. My dad is poor and a motorcycle mechanic, and I also work in his garage, so I know everything he does. That is how they took them. The next day in the morning, my uncle and I went to where they were taken and we saw his body there, so we took him and buried him accordingly. This is the brief story of what happened to us. He died and left many of us. We are 11 (his kids) and I’m the eldest. So that is why when I was approached about documenting our story I agreed to it. We need to say all that we know and answer all the questions we are asked concerning this, because only those that genuinely care about you would want to hear your story. Salihu – just wanted to clarify one thing, are you certain its soldiers that killed your father or Boko Haram? Victim – I’m quiet certain its soldiers and Mopol. Because there was a friend of mine who is about my age, he was also wounded with a bullet in his shoulder. He has since been treated and is recovering. Most of these things I heard from him — including my dad’s last words which he told them to pass to me. This is all I have to say regarding this. Salihu – Thank you.

“Terrorism has no religion”

Sen. Ali Ndume, a representative from Borno State, address the gathering at the #BringBackOurGirls sit-in at Unity Fountain in Abuja

Sen. Ali Ndume, a representative from the local government in Borno State where 276 girls have been abducted, addresses the gathering at the #BringBackOurGirls sit-in at Unity Fountain in Abuja

Sen. Ali Ndume, a senator from Borno State representing Chibok Local Government where the abduction of 276 girls took place some three weeks ago, addressed a #BringBackOurGirls sit-in at Unity Fountain in Abuja. This  sit-in follows protests against Nigerian government’s seeming inaction following a mass abduction of schoolgirls from a boarding school while they were taking a science exam, and government’s eventual response casting doubt over the number of girl’s abducted.

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“When God brings a plague…”

A volunteer for TAP spoke to Hamid, a man who lives in Maiduguri, about the impact of the militancy on the livelihood of those in town and villages. The violence in Maiduguri has subsided, he says, but challenges remain in towns and villages.

What changes have you noticed as a result of the militants’ activities in your area?

Bismillah Ar Rahman, Ar Rahim(In the name of Allah, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful). We are facing challenges in the town [Maiduguri] no doubt, but with what we have seen before it has subsided unlike the way it was previously. What concerns us is that which is currently happening at the villages and the sad events around us.

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