Tag Archives: women

“The [humanitarian] emergency can provide an opportunity for new learning”

TAP spoke to Education Officer and Coordinator of the Education in Emergencies Working Group Nigeria Dr. Judith Giwa-Amu, who facilitates coordination among several humanitarian organizations and federal government towards improved access to education for displaced children in the northeast. This is part of a three-part series on children and education in the northeast. In this interview, Dr. Giwa-Amu shares with us key details about education sector humanitarian response through which conflict-affected children are educated, teachers are being trained, and coordination is happening among all key actors. She also tells us how education of girls is being attended to, and tells us of what is happening in terms of education to Nigerian children who had managed to flee to camps in neighboring countries. She shares her hopes for increasing school enrollment and how larger organizations can bolster support for smaller ones to further improve on delivery of education of this vulnerable population of children in the region.

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“Everybody was looking to leave Madagali, but I wanted to get my daughter back”

Hauwa Ibrahim fled her hometown of Gwoza when Boko Haram took control of the area, but lost her daughter in the process. In this interview, she shares how her daughter got captured by Boko Haram and how she and her family escaped to safety. She also talks about the Malkohi camp where she currently stays and how she and her family are making ends meet. 

This interview is part of a body interviews done in partnership between Guardian Newspaper and Oxfam Nigeria. For information on how to support local organizations working with displaced people in the northeast, reach out to us testimonialarchiveproject@gmail.com 
My name is Hauwa Ibrahim and I am from the town of Gwoza. It was the time Boko Haram entered our community that I left Gwoza.
In Gwoza town, when the attack came it was on a Tuesday evening. We all ran into our houses and stayed indoors for two days. On Thursday, we couldn’t stay any longer, because we got information that Boko Haram were out to kill only our husbands, so that’s when we set out and ran away from Gwoza we ran to Madagali. Our husbands ran and went to the hills. Some of the men went to meet with their families when things got quiet, but for me I didn’t see my husband till after another Thursday when he eventually turned up because all of us were apprehensive.
At the time the military came over to take the town of Gwoza everyone went haywire. People ran helter- skelter. My daughter who at the time was almost 12 years old ran away I didn’t know where everybody ran to because we were running. I have 6 children, and four are biologically mine (2 belong to my co–wife). At the time when the aircrafts came and they were shooting down to recapture the town of Gwoza, I decided to take these children and run away. That was when I learnt my daughter was taken by Boko Haram.
We escaped to Madagali because it is not too far from Gwoza. While we were trying to leave Madagali we now found out that Madagali has been shut down because Boko Haram had captured Madagali as well. Everybody was look to leave Madagali, but I wanted to get my daughter back. I had information that she was with Boko Haram, so I sent my younger kids to go back to Gwoza and get her so we can run away together. But my daughter had already been hypnotized by them. She said they were actually going to come and help us so we will run away from Madagali but it was obvious that they were going to hold us hostage. I decided that we weren’t going to sleep in Madagali that night. We met with someone who said he was going to help us, so we begged him to take us to the border town, and I got him a little something to give him as a thank you.
We were able to cross into Cameroon through Yaounde town. Some of their customs officers who were very nice to us; they gave us food for our children and opened a room for us in one of their offices and let us to lie down. It was there they were able to get us a vehicle to another small village not too far from there.
We were in Makolo for three days, from where we were able to get a bigger vehicle that will transport all of us. It was there I was able to get my husband’s number and I called him. He said he was already in Yola and if we were able to get ourselves out of there, we will meet him up in Yola. So they got us out there and took us to another place close to the border that wasn’t too far from Yola, then we got another vehicle that transported us to Yola.
In Yola, we got information that the people of Gwoza had a settlement community in Malkohi. That was how we got here. God has been good to us so far.
But I still have not found any information my daughter. My husband used to be a driver. He left Gwoza without anything, not even shoes. Someone got him a tricycle a keke napep (commercial tricycle) and bought 4, and that was what he was using to make some earnings with that he was able to get some money. Now the keke napep work has folded up. He bought me a grinding machine and sewing machine because that used to be my business before at home. That is what we are keeping up with now.

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“For somebody who has lost all that he laboured for, he will have to start afresh”

Dr. Oluwasina Olabanji is the Director of the Borno State-based federal body Lake Chad Research Institute (LCRI), which is in charge of managing agriculture in Nigeria’s conflict-affected northeastern zone. He has lived in Borno State since 1988 when he started working at the LCRI and has been working with farmers in the region ever since. He speaks to TAP about how violence in the northeast has affected food prices in Nigeria, how farmers in conflict-affected states have fared over the last 6 years, opportunities for agricultural development in the northeast, and what he believes the federal and the region’s state governments must do to get the region’s farmers resettled and the region’s agriculture-based economy working again. 

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“Dead bodies are all over the place with no one to bury them except the pigs and dogs eating them”

Mary Paul from Adamawa State fled her village in Michika Local Government in Adamawa State after a Boko Haram attack. She has moved from place to place since then, and has most recently settled in Waru Community in Abuja. She shares her story and her expectations of the new government.

What is your name?

I am Mary Paul from Adamawa State, Michika local Government.

Why are you in Waru?

My purpose of coming here is because of Boko Haram issue. They entered our village last year September 7. Majority of the people were in the church. They werer shouting ‘Allahu akbar, Allahu akbar, God is great, God is great’. They were firing gun shots. Before we knew it we were already running from one mounting to another mounting and another village to another village. That is how we ran from our village to Mubi and from Mubi to Yola, before they sent transport to us and we are here. When we came, we slept in Nyanya, and they said they will get house for us cheap, I better we remain here. When we got here, they took us to the chief, and we explained to the chief and he said there is no problem.

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“The responsibility of the state to protect its people doesn’t cease because they have been internally displaced”

TAP interviewed the Executive Director of the National Human Rights Commission Chidi Odinkalu on the mass displacement in Nigeria as a result of conflict, with a particular focus on the conflict ongoing in the north-east. In this interview, he gives an overview of displacement in Nigeria in recent years and tells us how internally displaced people (IDPs) were treated during the elections. He talked about the Commission’s work with media partners to bring to light sexual and other abuses of IDPs, and how politicians in both of Nigeria’s major parties exploited the internally displaced during the recently concluded elections. He also talked about the need for more inter-agency work with regards to IDPs, and what support government needs to provide for that to happen.

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“May God meet them at the point of their need”

A young volunteer resident in Yola spoke with displaced persons granted shelter in a camp in Yola, Adamawa State. The displaced from this camp were mostly from communities on the border with Borno and Adamawa States, including Madagali, Michika and Mubi. These interviews took place in the Hausa language, and a translation of the interviews is below. 

What is your name?

Abubakar Manu.

Why are you here?

Well, we came to camp because in this camp, government is providing security for our lives, feeding us and taking care of our well being.

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“For the 57 girls that escaped, they have all been rehabilitated and we have provided them psychological support”

This post is part of a series of interviews with subject matter experts on the northeast of Nigeria and the ongoing militant violence. TAP hopes these interviews will contribute to an issue-driven conversation on what relevant actors in the region can do to help stop the violence and improve well-being of Nigerians living in violence-prone areas.

Among the challenges in information sharing on the situation ongoing in northeast Nigeria is getting a sense of what the state government is doing to alleviate suffering of the population under its aegis, and what support is needed on the well-being of Nigerians living in the area. The Borno Commissioner of Health Min. Salma Anas-Kolo talked to TAP 10 days ago about her work in service delivery in Borno State, sharing insight into the challenges of internal displacement, the state of public health, and the ways in which state and federal governments are working together in healthcare. She talks about the overcrowding at the displacement camps and the cholera outbreak in the camps as a result. She also addresses the state’s provision of mental health services to 57 girls from Chibok Local Government Area of Borno State who managed to escape their abductors, and the challenges the state is facing in terms of human resources and support.

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“Gender has always been a component of the way [Boko Haram] violence has happened, and it’s become more explicitly so”

This post is part of a series of interviews with subject matter experts on the northeast of Nigeria and the ongoing militant violence. TAP hopes these interviews will contribute to an issue-driven conversation on what relevant actors in the region can do to help stop the violence and improve well-being of Nigerians living in violence-prone areas.

Elizabeth Pearson is a gender and extremism analyst who is studying towards a PhD at King’s College London on gender norms in Jihadi and counter-Jihadi radicalisation. and a member of the Nigerian Security Network. She co-wrote a report titled, “Women, Gender and the evolving tactics of Boko Haram,” Journal of Terrorism Research, Volume 5, Issue 1, February 2014. This report addresses an under-researched aspect of Boko Haram’s activities: gender-based violence (GBV) and its targeting of women. It argues that 2013 marked a significant evolution in Boko Haram’s tactics, with a series of kidnappings, in which one of the main features was the instrumental use of women. In this interview, Pearson puts the well-known abduction of over 200 girls in Chibok Local Government Area spurned the #BringBackOurGirls protests in Nigeria and elsewhere in context. She discusses the ways in which gender-based violence has featured in the ongoing insurgency on the part of both the military and the militants, the ways in which Muslim and Christian women have been treated durning the violence by the militant group, and the ways in which the government can help communities affected by the violence in the remote communities affected by the violence.

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“Young people have no alternative but to come together to seek ways to be safe”

Yusuf, a youth activist in Maiduguri, speaks to TAP on the ways in which young people are working independently and in tandem with security forces to combat the insecurity in Borno State. He makes interesting observations on the difference in youth-security dynamic in Borno and Yobe States, and the ways in which women contribute to intelligence gathering. You can listen to the interview below. An edited transcript of our conversation follows.

Some of the major issues for young people is obviously safety, but I’m interested in exploring the ways in which young people have been resisting the armed groups.

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“I could count 3 dead bodies that I saw with my eyes”

An aerial attack on Kafa village in Yobe State killed Zara’s grandson and brother, while Aisha’s husband and 2 children are missing. Both women have been displaced from their homes and robbed of their livelihood. A volunteer for TAP Salihu spoke to the two women in Yobe State through an interpreter. Aisha and Zara speak Kanuri, but the interpreter and the interviewer spoke Hausa.

Salihu – Can you please tell us your name and your state, just the first name

Interpreter – Her name is Zara

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